Category Filming Tricks and Tips

Funny Bloopers – Star Wars

 

Funny Bloopers – YouTube

Watching these bloopers (thanks to YouTube) often show the background set incorporates green and blue screen as mentioned in my previous blog ‘CGI-Blue vs. Green Screen‘, however, here are some funny posts to bring in your New Year with a laugh! Enjoy!

And even more funnies made from technical stuff (usual term is prop failure) backstage.

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CGI – Blue vs. Green Screen Chroma Keying

CGI – Blue vs. Green Screen

Chroma key compositing, or chroma keying, is a special effects / post-production technique for compositing (layering) two images or video streams together.

Almost all studios nowadays use green screens, however there was a time when blue chroma key screens were the main stay.

One of the things the general public are unaware of is whichever colour is used, has to be avoided in any of the set pieces, props and costumes/clothing of the person being filmed because the colour will pick up and show any background overlay (such as a mountain scene) – a big no-no.

Green chroma key screens became the ultimate universal ‘CGI canvas’ because with the blue chroma key there was more ‘bleeding’ around the actors and set items making the foreground images a little blurry with...

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Old fashioned makeup Trivia/Tricks

Old fashioned makeup Trivia/Tricks

Remember the time when most movies were black and white?

Here’s some old fashioned makeup, trivia and tricks!

For example the 1960’s Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Psycho’ starring Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh amongst other great actors of the time.

One of the most memorable scenes was the stabbing in the shower and to this day people use the sound effect to describe a vicious scary attack.

During the filming of that scene the ‘FX’ crew were using different types of ‘blood’ unsuccessfully before they found the right ‘flow’ effect as it was washing down the drain hole.

Finally they discovered that ‘Hershey’s Chocolate Syrup’ gave the perfect seeping, stickiness and blending with the water and because the film was ‘black and white’, hid that the blood was not red.

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